We invite you to consider proposing a 5-week summer course or a 10-week spring or autumn research apprenticeship at FHL. Proposals are reviewed by the FHL Advisory Committee in spring of each year for spring, summer, and autumn quarters of the following year. For a more intimate, one-on-one teaching experience, you may want to consider mentoring a summer research intern.

TEACH AN FHL COURSE

LEAD A TEAM OF RESEARCH APPRENTICES

MENTOR A SUMMER RESEARCH INTERN


TEACH AN FHL COURSE

Summer Courses

FHL has two 5-week summer terms, offering 3-4 courses in each: regularly scheduled core courses as well as ones that vary from year to year, often focused on specialized topics. Summer courses are taught by faculty from institutions nation- (and world-) wide and, with a reputation for excellence, attract top undergraduate and graduate students. If you have an idea for a 5-week course you’d like to teach at FHL, we welcome your proposal.

If a course has been approved, it will be listed as an offering for that summer. As long as enrollment reaches the minimum required to be viable (usually 12 students), FHL will run the course and provide:

  • 1.5-month, full-time appointments for each of two faculty
  • technical and administrative assistance
  • financial support for course expenses
  • partial financial aid for students
  • if course enrollment is 15 or more, FHL also provides on TA

PROPOSE A SUMMER COURSE

Course proposals should be submitted the year prior to the summer for which you are proposing your course (e.g., submit in May 2021 for summer 2022). For classes that require a longer lead time, proposals may be submitted two years in advance. 

To apply, e-mail the following application elements as PDFs to Megan Dethier by May 15:

In one PDF:

  1. Name of proposed course
  2. Your name, address, e-mail
  3. Any special constraints? For example, lead time, season, year, outside funding, etc.
  4. Summer A or Summer B preferred and why?
  5. Please indicate for the benefit of people who don’t know your field why this course is important now and why it should be offered at UW-FHL, rather than in UW-Seattle (or e.g., Denver)
  6. How does your teaching experience relate to this course proposal?
  7. How many students would be registered?
  8. How will the course use FHL facilities in the following categories?
    – Organisms
    – Wet labs
    – Research Vessel
    – Dock/boats
    – SCUBA
    – FHL analytical gear
    – Other
  9. Your CV

In a second PDF:

  1. A 2-3 page substantive description of the course including a plan or syllabus.  This should include a description or list of the learning goals for the course, and at least a general overview of week-by-week topics and activities.

Proposals will be reviewed by the Teaching Advisory Committee. We are looking for courses that are fundamental and important to the education of students who are likely to become national leaders in marine science. Truly innovative courses, i.e. those likely to put together people and ideas that yield fresh thinking and understanding across disciplines, are eagerly sought out. Because of the demand for FHL facilities, courses (even very important ones) that can be taught equally well or better elsewhere, are likely to receive a lower priority. If a proposed course will incur unusual costs such as extensive ship time, use of the OA lab, or genetic sequencing, it will more likely be approved if the proposal includes sources of outside funding.

TEACH AN EXISTING SUMMER COURSE

We are sometimes looking for faculty to teach one of our regularly-offered, core summer courses (e.g. Marine Invertebrates, Marine Botany, Embryology, and Fish Biology). If you are interested in teaching one of these, contact Megan directly to find out about possible openings.

Spring & Autumn Courses

Occasionally we have courses ‘on the books’ for spring and fall quarter for which we do not yet have faculty lined up. If you have a quarter free from other responsibilities and would like to be considered to be an instructor for a pre-existing spring or fall course (usually at 50% FTE), contact Megan.


LEAD A TEAM OF RESEARCH APPRENTICES

Research apprenticeships are intense, full-time training experiences offered to qualified undergraduates and post-baccalaureates in spring and autumn quarters at FHL. A group of 8-12 students work on focused research guided by faculty and graduate student mentors. Students report that these experiences make them more likely to choose scientific research as a career option. Leading an apprenticeship is very time-intensive but extremely rewarding.

Faculty and researchers are invited to submit an application to lead a 10-week apprenticeship in a science, engineering, policy or other field that can be supported at FHL. Apprenticeships typically investigate a topical research area of interest to individual faculty. They may also focus on specific research skills, e.g. microscopy or molecular biology, on whole organismal groups, or on important issues such as marine conservation policy. See previous and current Research Apprenticeship programs for examples. Innovation and new perspectives are encouraged.

As long as enrollment reaches the minimum required to be viable (usually 8 students), FHL will provide:

  • one three-month, 100% FTE appointment for a faculty member (can be split among two or more faculty)
  • one half-time graduate student RA
  • technical and administrative assistance
  • financial support for course expenses such as supplies and research vessel time
  • partial financial aid for students

PROPOSE A RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP

Apprenticeship proposals should be submitted the year prior to when you propose to lead the apprenticeship.

To apply, please e-mail the following application elements to Megan Dethier by April 30.

In one PDF:

  1. Name of proposed apprenticeship
  2. Your name, address, e-mail
  3. Any special constraints? For example, lead time, season, year, outside funding, etc.
  4. Autumn or Spring preferred and why?
  5. Please indicate for the benefit of people who don’t know your field why this apprenticeship is important now and why it should be offered at UW-FHL, rather than in UW-Seattle (or e.g., Denver)
  6. How does your teaching experience relate to this apprenticeship?
  7. How many students would be registered?
  8. How will the apprenticeship use FHL facilities in the following categories?
    – Organisms
    – Wet labs
    – Research Vessel
    – Dock/boats
    – SCUBA
    – FHL analytical gear
    – Other
  9. Your CV

In a second PDF:

  1. A 2-3 page substantive description of the apprenticeship including a plan or syllabus.  This should include a description or list of the learning goals for the course, and at least a general overview of week-by-week topics and activities.

Proposals will be reviewed by the Teaching Advisory Committee, which by mid-May will decide on apprenticeships for the following year. The Committee will be looking for training experiences that are fundamental and important to the education of students who are likely to become national leaders in marine science. Truly innovative apprenticeships, i.e. those likely to put together people and ideas that yield fresh thinking and understanding across disciplines, are eagerly sought out. Because of the demand for FHL facilities, apprenticeships (even very important ones) that can be taught equally well or better elsewhere are likely to receive a lower priority.


MENTOR A SUMMER INTERN

The REU-Blinks Summer Internship program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the FHL Blinks Endowment, offers hands-on, full-immersion summer research internships to 12-15 motivated undergraduates and post-baccalaureates. Participants in the program work 1:1 with a marine scientist on a full-time basis for eight weeks, learning both the process and the substance of scientific research.

Researchers are invited to submit a proposal to mentor a summer intern. See the list of projects offered in 2021 for examples. By mentoring an intern, you will receive full-time assistance from a motivated student for your research at FHL as well as the rewards of enriching the student with a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  In addition, FHL will provide laboratory space for your research and a structured program for your intern to fully engage in the summer activities at FHL.

To apply, email the following application elements to Dr. Stacy Farina by December 15 for the following year’s summer internship. Also be sure to submit a Researcher Application (due February 1) in order to reserve housing and the appropriate lab space.

  1. Your CV
  2. Name of research project
  3. Your name, address, e-mail
  4. A one page description of your research, as it applies to the work that will be expected from the intern(s)
  5. How many students could you mentor?
  6. How will the addition of an intern add use of FHL facilities in the following categories?
    – Organisms
    – Wet labs
    – Research Vessel
    – Dock/boats
    – SCUBA
    – FHL analytical gear
    – Other

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